Monday, 20 April 2015

Integrating Tone into Dialogue

Dialogue is a key part of any story and it’s usually what readers find most engrossing. They might skim long descriptions, but when they get to someone speaking that’s where they’ll get pulled back in.

What people say and how they say it not only tells the reader what’s going on, it also sets mood, gives an idea of character and provides a natural back and forth that will naturally keep readers engaged.

It helps to keep the flow going when characters are talking, and being able to convey how characters are saying things without explicitly stating it is a very useful skill.

Here’s a basic example of what I mean: “Go to Hell!”

You know how that’s being said without my having to put he said angrily in the narrative. Hearing how the character speaks in the moment is a powerful tool, but it’s easier for some emotions than others.

Anger, like in the example above, is pretty straightforward. Exclamation mark, swear words, all caps—these are pretty easy to work in and for the reader to pick up on. Other emotions and tones aren’t so obvious, but there are a number of techniques that can help.

The best place to see all the different approaches is to read plays and screenplays. These are very dialogue intensive media with a specific culture of putting the bare minimum of descriptors when it comes to what is being said.

Reading the scripts of plays and movies that you like or that are of the same genre that you write can be very illuminating, but it’s also very time consuming. You can’t just read them like you would a normal story, even though you may find yourself doing just that. You have to stop yourself from being swept along—which can be quite difficult since that’s exactly what it’s designed to do—and go over the same section repeatedly until you see exactly what’s being transmitted and how.

This is quite tedious and not for everyone, but if it’s something you find interesting, as I do, then it will prove to be very revealing. In the meantime, here are some things I’ve picked up.

It’s helps if we see the thing that causes an emotion. For example, if a mother is irritated by a child focused on their iPhone when she’s trying to tell him something, then that’s a lot easier to convey than the same woman still in a bad mood because of that child a chapter later when she’s at the shops.

Having the trigger in the same scene means you can establish the cause of the emotion, assuming you can clearly set up the situation (who doesn’t find being ignored by someone glued to their phone irritating?), and the reader will simply transfer their feelings onto the characters.

Using specific verbs that suggest a particular mind set also helps. If she takes the phone from him, it tells you a lot more if she snatches it or rips it from his hands.

This is particularly useful when you have a set of short question and answer type dialogue where you don’t want to break it up with descriptions of people’s raised eyebrows and tightened jaws.

Once the phone is grabbed, the tone of the conversation between mother and child is clearly defined and doesn’t need to be restated after every line.

One strong action, whether a pat on the back or a surreptitious look in someone’s shopping bag, can establish the tone for any length of interaction.

Another method to control the tone is to use tempo. If a character is asked a question and then gives a long answer, that has a different effect to a character who is asked a question, gives a partial answer, has to be prompted for more, and so on.

Who talks more, who interrupts, who holds back, these things give an indication of a character’s state of mind and attitude without having to say Dave paused and looked out of the window to tell the reader what’s going on if you vary the tempo and line length.
If you found this post useful please give it a retweet. Cheers.

12 comments:

Alex J. Cavanaugh said...

Excellent point! There is a lot we can convey with dialogue and convey it better than a tag or explanation.
And yes, being ignored by someone on his cell phone is annoying.

Michael Offutt, Phantom Reader said...

I was just talking about this with Helena (another blogger) and how I love to read screenplays. Great expose on the importance of dialogue.

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LD Masterson said...

I haven't tried studying screenplays or plays. Good suggestion. Thanks.

Chemist Ken said...

Dialogue is definitely one of those areas where I need to improve. Maybe it's because I'm quiet in real life? I suppose I should spend those quiet times listening to how everyone else is saying things.

Kristin James said...

This is a cool post! You've definitely given a lot of genuinely good tips here, thanks!

Marianne Kearns said...

"This finite existence is only a test, son," God Almighty sed to me in my coma. "Beyond thy earthly tempest is where you'll find corpulent eloquence" (paraphrased). Lemme tella youse without d'New Joisey accent...

I actually saw Seventh-Heaven when we died: you couldn't GET any moe curly, extravagantly-surplus-lush Upstairs when my beautifull, brilliant, bombastic girl passed-away at 17.

Find-out where we went on our journey far, far away like the symbiotically, synonyMOUSE metaphors which creep across thy brain bringing U.S. together, exorbitantly done in four, sardonic satires.

"Those who are wise will shine as brightly as the expanse of the Heavens, and those who have instructed many in uprightousness as bright as stars for all eternity" -Daniel 12:3

Here's also what the prolific, exquisite GODy sed: 'the more you shall honor Me, the more I shall bless you' -the Infant Jesus of Prague.

Go git'm, girl. You're incredible.
See you Upstairs...
I won't be joining'm in da nasty Abyss where Isis prowls
eklektikmantra.blogspot.com

-YOUTHwitheTRUTH
-------------------------------
PS Need some uncommon, unique, uncivilized names? Lemme gonna gitcha started:

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God blessa youse
-Fr. Sarducci, ol SNL

Marianne Kearns said...

"This finite existence is only a test, son," God Almighty sed to me in my coma. "Beyond thy earthly tempest is where you'll find corpulent eloquence" (paraphrased). Lemme tella youse without d'New Joisey accent...

I actually saw Seventh-Heaven when we died: you couldn't GET any moe curly, extravagantly-surplus-lush Upstairs when my beautifull, brilliant, bombastic girl passed-away at 17.

Find-out where we went on our journey far, far away like the symbiotically, synonyMOUSE metaphors which creep across thy brain bringing U.S. together, exorbitantly done in four, sardonic satires.

"Those who are wise will shine as brightly as the expanse of the Heavens, and those who have instructed many in uprightousness as bright as stars for all eternity" -Daniel 12:3

Here's also what the prolific, exquisite GODy sed: 'the more you shall honor Me, the more I shall bless you' -the Infant Jesus of Prague.

Go git'm, girl. You're incredible.
See you Upstairs...
I won't be joining'm in da nasty Abyss where Isis prowls
eklektikmantra.blogspot.com

-YOUTHwitheTRUTH
-------------------------------
PS Need some uncommon, unique, uncivilized names? Lemme gonna gitcha started:

Oak Woods, Athena Noble, Autumn Rose, Faith Bishop, Dolly Martin, Willow Rhodes, Cocoa Major, China Stone, Bullwark Burnhart, Magnus Wilde, Kardiak Arrest, Will Wright, Goldy Silvers, Sophie Sharp, Gloria Hood, Violet Snow, Lizzy Roach, BoxxaRoxx, Aunty Dotey, Romero Stark, Zachariah Neptoon, Turkey Sherwood, Mercurio Morrissey, Victoria Faulkner, Fritz & Felix Yates, Mortimer Victor, Isabella Kennedy...

God blessa youse
-Fr. Sarducci, ol SNL

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